For the First Time in 14 Years, the NSA Can’t Get Your Phone Records. Or Can They?

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As reported over at Vice

As of midnight on Sunday, for the first time since 2001, the NSA lost its legal authority to collect Americans phone records in bulk.

The Senate let three provisions of the Patriot Act expire on Sunday, including the controversial Section 215, which allows the spy agency to collect all phone records from telephone companies every three months, a practice that was ruled illegal by a judge less than a month ago.

Two other provisions of the Patriot Act also expired. One of them allowed the government to obtain warrants from the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to spy on suspected “lone wolf” terrorists; and the other, known as the “roving wiretap,” allowed investigators to obtain permission to spy on multiple phones owned by one suspect with just one application.

While this might seem like a victory for anti-surveillance advocates, the truth is that most of the Patriot Act stands, and even this victory is going to be a short-lived one.

The headline of the Vice article misleading. NSA still has the power to spy on your phone activity and they will continue to do so as long as those data centers remain intact.

In the 1980s when NSA started building the system, they were in fact violating the law. so what makes anyone think they won’t now?

The USA Freedom Act that could be passed keeps the spying going, but shuffles around who gets the data to make it look like there has been some sort of improvement, but the real agenda is to trick you Americans into believing that your privacy has been restored, so that we will not create our own systems of encryption to protect our business secrets from the government.


Chris Perkins is chief editor and writer for Authentic Enlightenment and host/producer of Authentic Enlightenment Radio on the CAV Radio Network

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